Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content
Skip Navigation LinksBoys Town National Research Hospital > Knowledge Center > Articles > Auditory Consultant Resource Network Continues Work in Guam: Part C & Part B Educational Programs

Auditory Consultant Resource Network Continues Work in Guam: Part C & Part B Educational Programs

​​​On a mission to improve outcomes for children who are deaf or hard of hearing, Boys Town National Research Hospital’s Auditory Consultants, Jeff Simmons M.A., CCC-A; Katie Brennan M.S., CCC-SLP; and Catherine Carotta Ed.D., CCC-SLP, continue work with Part C and Part B programs in Guam.

The goal of the consultative service is to improve outcomes for children who are deaf or hard of hearing. The work is funded by the Guam Department of Education, Division of Special Education and under the direction of Yolanda Gabriel, Associate Superintendent for Special Education in collaboration with Guam's Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program.

"The Boys Town consultants provide valuable training to help improve services and outcomes for our children who are deaf or hard of hearing,” said Elaine Eclavea, Initiative Area Coordinator at the University of Guam Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities Education, Research, and Service (Guam CEDDERS). “They bring a wealth of information on current best practices to our island where accessing such specialized supports on a consistent basis is a challenge.”

The focus for Part C training has been on developing family-centered practices which have resulted in Guam's adaptation of the model of home intervention, developed by Mary Pat Moeller, Ph.D.​ and Arlene Stredler Browns, SLP-C.E.D., by using the following Home Visit form.

The Guam Early Intervention System members have report that the training and technical assistance provided by Boys Town consultants has greatly enhanced their skills in meeting the needs of the families and children who are deaf and hard of hearing.

Part B training has included distance and onsite coaching on the inclusion of auditory practices for students using sign language.

Teachers, speech-language therapists, and program administrators attending the webinars and onsite consultation sessions report the overview of the continuum of services has greatly improved their foundational understanding of the supports needed by children who are deaf or hard of hearing, and the assessment tools, profile presentations, and coaching strategies have been very useful in improving instructional activities.

Further updates coming in our next newsletter will include an Assessment & Planning Early Intervention Profile created for Guam Early Intervention Services.