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Free Class on Living Well with Hearing Loss

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Contact: Brooke Wittrock
Manager, Marketing and Communications
402-498-6640
Brooke.Wittrock@boystown.org

Aug. 3, 2015
For Immediate Release

Free Class on Living Well with Hearing Loss

OMAHA, NEB. – Nearly 40 million Americans have some degree of hearing loss. If hearing loss is affecting you, you are not alone. Boys Town Audiology is offering a free one hour class for anyone who is concerned about their hearing or the hearing of a friend or loved one.

Living Well with Hearing Loss

Wednesday, August 19, 2015
10:00 a.m. or 6:00 p.m.
Boys Town Medical Campus
14040 Hospital Road – Pacific Street Clinic
(139th & Pacific Street)

“This class will help explain, educate and inform participants about the different options available to help them live better with hearing loss,” said Megan Thomas, Au.D., Audiologist at Boys Town National Research Hospital, who will be leading the class. Megan will explain:

  • Different types of hearing loss
  • Treatments for hearing loss
  • Communication strategies
  • Hearing aid and listening device options
  • The possible effects of untreated hearing loss

Registration is required by contacting Boys Town Audiology at 402-498-6520 or registering online at boystownhospital.org. The class includes a light snack. Attendees will have time to ask questions following the presentation.

Boys Town Audiology is available at Boys Town Medical Campus – Downtown Clinic, 555 North 30th Street, (402) 498-6520 and Boys Town Medical Campus – Pacific Street Clinic, 14040 Hospital Road, (402)778-6800.

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ABOUT BOYS TOWN NATIONAL RESEARCH HOSPITAL
Boys Town National Research Hospital is internationally recognized as a leader in educational, clinical and research programs focusing on children who are deaf or hard of hearing, visually impaired, or who have related communication disorders. The Hospital has developed national programs that are now instituted in schools, hospitals and clinics across the country. The Hospital annually serves more than 47,000 children and families from across the United States.